Buying A Home In Portland And Vancouver Area With No Owner Disclosures

Dated: 01/18/2015

Views: 1060

    Suppose that in the course of buying a home in the Portland or Vancouver area, your eye is drawn to a bank-owned home, or a home held in a trust. There are many reasons why you could find yourself buying a Portland or Vancouver area home that’s currently vacant—which can also mean that the usual owner disclosures are not to be had. There are perfectly innocent reasons why this situation develops. Suppose the sellers of the property have just inherited it. How would they know that water tends to pool under the house during a strong rainstorm? Or that unpermitted repairs were made to the electric wiring in the kitchen? 

 Image title   If thoughts like these cause beads of sweat to pop out all over your forehead, don’t fret. We can find you plenty of alternatives in the Portland or Vancouver area’s traditional housing market. But before you automatically pass on a vacant home because of unknowns in its history, you should know that, with due diligence, you can still end up with a home that is worth your money and a safe place to live!

    When you consider a vacant home, the most reliable information will come after you have arranged an inspection. The inspector’s report will let you learn what you’re getting into before you buy—and whether it’s in safe and livable condition. Most homes that fall vacant due to circumstances like divorce or a move are well cared-for and in decent shape; others, long abandoned, are more likely to have fallen into disrepair. Without any owner disclosures, you’ll be on your own to discover potentially major issues like leaking pool equipment or pest problems.

    Even after you’ve had a thorough inspection, there is still a good chance you will encounter at least some surprises. There are some elements of a home that can’t really be properly inspected—like what lies under the floorboards or behind attic walls. Since there is no former owner to sound a warning, there is always a chance that you could run into unplanned-for expenses. Truth to tell, though, this can also hold true for a traditional home if the sellers have no prior knowledge, either.

    Although buying a home with no disclosures can be a great way to get a wonderful deal, it’s still a good idea to leave some extra budget for the most likely potential costs. In addition to things like insurance, unexpected repairs, and maintenance, there are other costs you might also need to cover—such as a vacancy endorsement on your insurance policy if the house will continue to stand vacant for more than 30 days after the sale.

    The bottom line? If you’re considering buying a home in the Portland or Vancouver areawith question marks in its history, be sure you apply some energetic diligence before signing on the dotted line. You’ll be a lot more relaxed after the fact.  

    Thinking of buying an Portland or Vancouver areahome? Then it’s time to give me a call!

Chris Swanberg - OR and WA Buyer Specialist

Chris Swanberg was born and raised in the Alameda area of Portland and now lives in Happy Valley. He spent eight years in the home improvement industry, working in sales and project management. Chris....

Want to Advertise on this Site?

Latest Blog Posts

The True Cost Of Not Owning A Home

There are a lot of reasons why owning is better than renting, here are a few reasons comparing the cost of not owning a home:1- The Price is so CloseRenters are facing increases everyday. With

Read More

Three Tips For Making An Offer

1- Determine a Price RangeThis should happen right before you start the homebuying process. If you don’t know how much you can afford, you will be shopping in the dark with a blank check

Read More

Spacious Longview Home For Sale 230 St James CT Longview 98632

Located in Longview, WA. Built in 2000, This sprawling & spacious home backs to a green space with wildlife and trees for a peaceful retreat! At 3604 sq. ft. This beautiful 5 bedroom, Daylight Ranch

Read More